Special Character

  • Riverbend Bible Church

    Brief

    To provide geotechnical, structural, civil and fire engineering design as part of a design team from feasibility and concept through to construction completion.

    Project Outline

    This architecturally designed upgrade of the existing multi-use building, incorporated a new ablutions block and enclosed walkway linking the two facilities. The project included stormwater design, new foundations, steel frames, masonry and timber walls, as well as demolition and strengthening of existing brick walls.

    Challenges

    The geotechnical report indicated the site had geotechnical challenges which required upgraded foundation solutions including foundation ties and rafting.

    We were required to create a structural design that met the client’s criteria, while  minimally disrupting the interior of the multi-use building. This was achieved by applying strengthening to the exterior using buttressing structures for strengthening and structural framing of additional walkways and utility rooms.

    We also had to design on-site stormwater disposal solutions.

     

  • Maryknoll Chapel

    Brief

    To provide geotechnical, structural and fire engineering design from feasibility and concept through to the completion of construction.

    Project Outline

    The project involved an upgrade of the existing monastery accommodation block and construction of a new chapel. The development also included the upgrade of the accessway.

    Challenges

    The new chapel was a challenging structure, utilising curved glue-laminated timber rafters to form a dome on a sloping site.

  • Karamu High School Sculpture

    Brief

    To provide structural design from feasibility and concept through to the completion of construction.

    Project Outline

    The project involved foundation and super-structure design of a complex steel sculpture.

    Challenges

    The complexity of the structure required a combination of design modelling and on-site verification during fabrication.

    Outcome

    This work resulted in an aesthetically pleasing sculpture and a very satisfied client.

  • Hastings Courthouse Sculpture

    Brief

    To provide structural design from feasibility and concept through to completion of construction.

    Project Outline

    The project involved foundation and super-structure design of a complex steel sculpture.

    Challenges

    The complexity of the structure required a combination of design modelling and on-site verification during fabrication.

  • Greenmeadows New World Sculpture

    Brief

    To provide a structural design from feasibility and concept through to the completion of construction.

    Project Outline

    To design a metallic tree sculpture to be placed in the Greenmeadows New World carpark. The structure was 6m high and each leaf was different.

    Challenges

    Due to the unique structural form of the sculpture, the design was based on a series of prototypes which were fabricated and tested before finalising the design.

    Outcome

    The project was completed on time and on budget and is now an iconic feature of the supermarket.

Napier City Council and IRD staff moving out of earthquake-prone buildings

Article by Simon Hendery

21 June 2017

NCC Building

Almost 200 local government and IRD workers are abandoning their offices in two earthquake-prone buildings owned by Napier City Council.

The council admitted to being surprised on Wednesday by a report that found its four-storey library building on the corner of Station and Dalton streets had been rated as low as 15 per cent of the new building code at its weakest point.

The findings prompted Inland Revenue, which leases space on two floors of the building, to immediate direct its 78 Napier staff to work from home. About 100 council staff will continue to work in the building.

But the council said it was moving as quickly as it could to relocate 115 staff from its adjacent civic building, which rated even worse under the Strata Group engineering assessment.

The report found the 1967 civic building rated as low as 10 per cent of new building code at its weakest point.

Staff were briefed on the report’s findings, and the process of moving staff out of the building began on Wednesday, council chief executive Wayne Jack said.

“We will relocate all our teams and our front counter from the civic building, and are aiming to do this as quickly as we can,” he said.

A spokesman for IRD said the department had moved its 78 Hawke’s Bay staff out of the two floors it leases from the council in the library building.

Those staff had the capacity to work remotely from home, or other locations, and would do so until the situation was assessed.

Jack said the council had been surprised by the library building’s 15 per cent rating, but the issues were “relatively quick and simple to remediate”.

Minor work within the stairwells, and to improve the seatings for the precast units throughout the structure, would begin soon and was expected to bring the building up to  close to 50 per cent of code.

Further work, which the council had already budgeted for, would then be undertaken to bring the building “as close to 100 per cent as possible”, Jack said.

But the Strata Group report points to demolition for the civic building, where the council has known for some time that seismic problems will be expensive to remedy.

It recently floated the idea of turning the library building into its main headquarters, and redeveloping the civic building site.

Strata Group director Guy Lethbridge said attempting to strengthen the civic building “would be a complex and widespread undertaking”, which engineers did not believe “represents value for money in that the strengthening costs could be more than a new build”.

On the other hand, “there is a strong case to be made for improving the strength of the Library Building, as this can be done through relatively straightforward works”.

Napier Mayor Bill Dalton said he was pleased the council had acted quickly to relocate its workers.

Staff had already started making preparations for “a range of scenarios” before receiving the Strata Group report. “One of those scenarios was the possibility that our teams would have to move out.”

 

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